Freitag, 24. November 2017

Circle Beret

In my part of the world it's getting colder and colder each day. When I leave the house early in the morning, a hat is just what I need to keep warm. If you feel the same, you can knit yourself this easy circle beret. It is started at the crown and increases in circles - just like the Circle Mitts I published a few years ago. Once it is wide enough you decrease and end with a few rows of ribbing.
The beginning may be a bit fiddly, but basically this pattern is suited for beginners and is a lovely showcase for selfstriping yarn. Besides knit and purl stitch you need to be able to do mk1-increases and a basic decrease (e.g. ssk).


There are two versions of the pattern text. One (longer one) exactly to the size, yarn (Aran weight) and gauge that I knitted. And a shorter one, that is written in a general way to fit different sized heads and different weight yarn. The longer version can also be used to get an idea of how the pattern works, e.g. to get you started.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • one skein (50 grams) of Aran weight yarn - I used Adriafil Zebrino - or another yarn of a different weight
  • 4.5 mm circular needles (you can used dpn's, too) - or the needles the yarn calls for
  • 4 mm circular needles - or needles a size smaller than the yarn calls for
  • a stitch marker to mark the end of the round
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques
  • Knitting a flat circle: Generally, a flat circle is knitted as follows.
    CO8 and join in round
    Round 1: k
    Round 2: *k1 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 2nd stitch is doubled) (-> 16 sts)
    Round 3: k
    Round 4: * k2 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 3rd stitch is doubled)(-> 24 sts)
    Round 5: k
    Round 6: * k3 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 4th stitch is doubled) (-> 32 sts)
    Round 7: k
    Round 8: * k4 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 5th stitch is doubled) (-> 40 sts)
    … I'm sure, the formula is clear by now, namely that you increase by 8 stitches every other row. It also means that the distance between the increases goes up by one in each of the increase-rounds. The same "formula" will be used when constructing the mitts. If you do the increases at the same spot a pattern (maybe even corners) will become visible; to achieve a look like a circle you need to start the increases at a different (randomly chosen) location in each increase row.
    Similarly, if you start with a big stitch number, you can knit a circle starting from the rim and decreasing by 8 stitches - evenly spaced - in each round.
  • Magic Ring CO: Basically, the magic ring technique (from crochet) is used to cast on knitted stitches. There are several videos on Youtube that show the technique - I used something similar to the technique shown in the first video, but since this is fiddly work, just use the one that suits you best.
However, if the Magic Ring CO is too fiddly for you, you can alternatively just CO 8 sts and join them in the round. Later, you can use the tail of your CO to close the open loop, by pulling it through the CO stitches and draw them closed.


Gauge, Size and What you Need to Measure
The pattern is written in a way that it can be adapted to any head size. I measured the circumference of my head and - on a beret that fitted me well - the diameter when it lay flat, i.e. at its widest point.
Since you start from the inside out - you can knit (and increase) until you reach the desired diameter and then knit on (and decrease) until you reach your head circumference. Therefore you don't really have to swatch.
If you want to knit the exact same beret that I knitted. Here are my numbers:

  • Gauge in stockinette stitch: 18 sts = 10 cm in width, 25 rows = 10 cm in height
  • Diameter at the widest point = 26 cm, i.e. 81 cm of circumference
  • Diameter at ribbing = 16 cm, i.e. a diameter of about 50 cm, since the ribbing stretches it fits my head circumference (55 cm).


Instructions

Short Version - to Fit any Size of Head and Weight of Yarn
This version will definitely work for you, if you've knitted a flat circle before (e.g. the Circle Mitts or the Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves).

Do a magic loop CO of 8 stitches. Your piece should now look similar to illustration 1 - see below.
Distribute the sts on the bigger needles (4.5mm) needles and knit one round. Now it should look like illustration 2. Place a stitch marker.

Alternate one round with circle increases (8 increases per round - started at a random point, but distributed evenly) with one knit-only round - until the piece has the circumference/diameter you want.
(I did this a total of 15 increase rounds, this means that I had 120 sts on my needles - I was about 7 cm short of my intended diameter).

Then - to create a bit of a slope - alternate one round of circle increases with two knit only rounds.
(I did this 3 times, i.e. afterwards I had a total of 144 sts on my needles -  the diameter was about 24 cm then.)

Then knit two knit-only rounds - without any increases or decreases.
Then alternate one round of circle decreases (8 decreases per round - started at a random point, but distributed evenly) with one knit-only round - until the inner edge fits snugly around your head.
(I did a total of 8 decrease rounds, i.e. I had 80 sts on my needles before I started the ribbing.)

With the smaller needles (4mm) knit 7 round of k2p2-ribbing. Loosely bind off in pattern in round 8.



Long Version - Exactly to my Gauge and Size
With your 4.5mm needles do a magic loop CO of 8 sts. - If this is too fiddly, you can alternatively just CO 8 sts and join them in the round. You can use the tail to close the open loop, by pulling it through the CO stitches and draw them closed. The piece should look similar to illustration 1.
Distribute the stitches on your 4.5mm needles and knit one round. Place a marker at the end of the round. Now your piece should look simlar to illustration 2.
Round 2: kbf all - now you have a total of 16 sts
Round 3: k all

Illustrations - click to enlarge


Round 4: * k1, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end - now you have a total of 24 sts
Round 5: k all
Round 6: * k3, mk1 repeat from * to end -> 32 sts
Round 7: k all
Round 8: * k1, mk1, k4 repeat from * to end -> 40 sts
Round 9: k all
Round 10: * k4, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end -> 48 sts
Round 11: k all
Round 12: * k2, mk1, k4 repeat from * to end ->  56 sts
Round 13: k all
Round 14: * k6, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end -> 64 sts
Round 15: k all - now your piece should look similar to illustration 3.
Round 16: * mk1, k8 repeat from * to end ->  72 sts
Round 17: k all
Round 18: * k4, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end ->  80 sts
Round 19: k all
Round 20: * k8, mk1, k2 repeat from * to end -> 88 sts
Round 21: k all
Round 22: * k2, mk1, k9 repeat from * to end -> 96 sts
Round 23: k all
Round 24: * k5, mk1, k7 repeat from * to end -> 104 sts
Round 25: k all
Round 26: * k10, mk1, k3 repeat from * to end ->  112 sts
Round 27: k all
Round 28: * k1, mk1, k13 repeat from * to end ->  120 sts
Round 29: k all
Round 30: k all
Round 31: * k10, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end ->  128 sts
Round 32: k all
Round 33: k all
Round 34: * k10, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end -> 136 sts
Round 35: k all
Round 36: k all
Round 37: * k6, mk1, k10 repeat from * to end ->  144 sts
Round 38: k all
Round 39: k all
Round 40: * k1, ssk, k15 repeat from * to end ->  136 sts
Round 41: k all
Round 42: * k10, ssk, k5 repeat from * to end ->  128 sts
Round 43: k all
Round 44: * k6, ssk, k8 repeat from * to end ->  120 sts
Round 45: k all
Round 46: * k12, ssk, k1 repeat from * to end -> 112 sts
Round 47: k all
Round 48: * k2, ssk, k10 repeat from * to end -> 104 sts
Round 49: k all
Round 50: * k11, ssk repeat from * to end ->  96 sts
Round 51: k all
Round 52: * k3, ssk, k7 repeat from * to end -> 88 sts
Round 53: k all
Round 54: * k8, ssk, k1 repeat from * to end -> 80 sts

Change to 4mm needles and do 7 rounds of k2p2-ribbing. Bind off loosely in pattern in round 8.

Weave in ends. 

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