Samstag, 29. November 2014

Helix Mitts

These mitts basically consist of a 10-stitch wide strip that winds around the wrists and hands. The strip is attached as you work, so no sewing is required.
They are all in garter stitch and a nice way to show of variegated yarn.

Left-hand and right-hand mitt are mirror inverted, so the directions are slightly different.



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




Deutsche Version / German Version
Im Rahmen eines Knitalongs in ihrer Wollstube hat Sabine Pohl eine deutsche Version dieser Anleitung geschrieben. Vielen Dank! Diese Anleitung gibt es hier und hier.


Materials
  • about 30 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 3mm needles (since the knitting is 10 stitches at the widest point, I used short dpns)
  • about 14 safety pins to mark rows
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends


Abbreviations and Special Techniques
  • Joining to rows at the edges: There are various ways to connect the last stitch of one ridge to the first stitch of another. I used the following ones:
    For the first mitt, I'd knit to the last stitch of the RS row slip it knitwise, pick up the front leg of the edge stitch, then insert the left hand needle as for a slip-slip knit and knit the two loops together. On the back row I'd slip the first stitch and knit to the end.
    Since the mitts are mirror inverted, they coil in the opposite direction. This meant that I had to do the join from the WS, like that. I'd knit to the last stitch and slip it as if to purl through the back loop (ptbl) with yarn in front, turn your work; pick up a leg of the edge stitch you want to join to and do a k2tog of this and the stitch you just turned.

    However, there are other methods to join rows at the edges, one method is shown here: http://youtu.be/3zPXZ4cu66Q . Please note that whatever you do, please stay consistent throughout one mitt.
     
  • German short rows: when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of double-stitch is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also http://youtu.be/PsBkXPmjgaE); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).

Instructions

First Mitt

Round 1:
CO2
R0: k2
R1: sl1 k1
R2: sl1, kfb
R3-R5: sl1, k to end
R6: sl1, kfb, k to end
R7-R9: sl1, k to end
Repeat rows 6 to 9 until there are 10 sts on your needles
Mark that row (this marker will be called Mid-Row-Marker-1)

Now repeat rows 8 and 9 until the strip fits around your wrist.
Mark the last row (this marker will be called Start-Round-Marker-1)

Round 2:
Fold the strip backwards (see picture on the right) so that you can connect the next row to the edge stitch of the very first row.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch knitwise, pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle into both stitches and knit like an ssk.
Standard Row 2 (SR2): sl1, k to end
Repeat these rows until you reach the ridge marked with Mid-Row-Marker-1, mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Mid-Round-Marker-2)

Repeat SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked Start-Round-Marker-1, mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Start-Round-Marker-2)

Round 3:
Repeat SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked Mid-Round-Marker-2, mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Mid-Row-Marker-3, it will also mark the beginning of the thumb increases).
The picture below shows some of the markers and their position on the mitt.

The following short row sequence serves to wide the mitts and to create a thumb gusset.
Thumb Row 1 = SR1
Thumb Row 2 = SR2
Thumb Row 3: sl1, k8, t+p
Thumb Row 4: k to end
Thumb Row 5 = SR1
Thumb Row 6 = SR2
Thumb Row 7: sl1, k7, t+p
Thumb Row 8: k to end
Thumb Row 9 = SR1
Thumb Row 10 = SR2
Thumb Row 11: sl1, k6, t+p
Thumb Row 12: k to end
Thumb Row 13 = SR1
Thumb Row 14 = SR2
Thumb Row 15: sl, k5, t+p
Thumb Row 16: k to end
Thumb Row 17 = SR1
Thumb Row 18 = SR2
Thumb Row 19: sl1, k6, t+p
Thumb Row 20: k to end
Thumb Row 21 = SR1
Thumb Row 22 = SR2
Thumb Row 23: sl1, k7, t+p
Thumb Row 24: k to end
Thumb Row 25 = SR1
Thumb Row 26 = SR2
Thumb Row 27: sl1, k8, t+p
Thumb Row 28: k to end
Thumb Row 29 = SR1
Thumb Row 30 = SR2
Mark this row (this marker will be called Thumb-End-Marker-1).

Repeat SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked Start-Round-Marker-2, mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Start-Round-Marker-3)

Round 4:
Repeat SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked Mid-Round-Marker-3, and mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Mid-Round-Marker-4)

Now the thumb gusset will be widened a bit more with some short rows.
Thumb Rows 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 = SR1
Thumb Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 = SR2
Thumb Row 11: sl1, k8, t+p
Thumb Row 12: k to end
Thumb Rows 13, 15, 17, 19, 21 = SR1
Thumb Rows 14, 16, 18, 20, 22 = SR2
Thumb Row 23: sl1, k8, t+p
Thumb Row 24: k to end
Thumb Rows 25, 27, 29, 31, 33  = SR1
Thumb Rows 26, 28, 30, 32, 34 = SR2
Mark the last row, this marker will be called Thumb-End-Marker-2.

Repeat SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked Start-Round-Marker-3, mark the next ridge (this marker will be called Start-Round-Marker-4)

Round 5:
Knit SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked with Mid-Round Marker-4.

Knit 6 ridges that are not connected to the round below:
Unattached Row 1: sl1, k to end
Unattached Row 2: sl1, k to end
(Repeated a total of 6 times)

Try the mitt on and try how it fits if the last knitted row were attached to the row marked with Thumb-End-Marker-2. If it feels to tight, knit one or two more unattached ridges.

Attach the next row to the row below Thumb-End-Marker-2

Knit SR1 and SR2 until you reach the ridge marked with Start-Round-Marker-4.
Row 1 = SR1
Row 2 = SR2
Row 3 =  sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch knitwise, pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle into both stitches and knit like an ssk.
Row 4 = sl1, ssk, k to end
Row 5 = SR1
Row 6 = SR2
Repeat rows 1 to 6 until there are only two stitches left
Last row: slip these two stitches knitwise (as if to do a k2tog), pick up edge stitch, insert left-hand needle the three loops on the needle and knit.
Cut yarn.


Second Mitt
There are tow differences that make the mitts mirror-images of one another:
a) the knitted strip is folded differently when first connecting the rows
b) the connection is done differently (i.e. standard rows 1 and 2 are different, as described below).


Knit Round 1 as for first mitt.

Round 2:
Fold the strip forwards (i.e. in the different direction than for first mitt) so that you can connect the next row to the edge stitch of the very first row.
Standard Row 1 (SR1): sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch wyif as if to do a ptbl
Standard Row 2 (SR2): pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), k to end
Repeat these rows until you reach the row marked with Mid-Row-Marker-1, mark this row (this marker will be called Mid-Row-Marker-2)

Continue round 2 and knit Round 3 and Round 4 as for the first mitt.

Round 5:
Knit as for first mitt until you reach Start-Round-Marker-4.
Row 1 = SR1
Row 2 = SR2
Row 3 = sl1, k to last stitch, slip last stitch wyif as if to do a ptbl
Row 4 = pick up edge stitch, k2tog (i.e. the last stitch of the last row and the picked up stitch), ssk, k to end
Row 5 = SR1
Row 6 = SR2
Repeat rows 1 to 6 until there are only two stitches left
Next-to-last row: sl1, sl1 as if to do a ptbl
Last row: pick up edge stitch, k3tog
Cut yarn.

Before you weave in the ends, turn the mitts inside out and decide which side you like best. Then weave in ends.







Sonntag, 16. November 2014

Bandages ...

... or rather fingerless gloves that are knitted in a narrow strip that winds itself around the hands. I'm not sure whether the shape is perfect, but at least it works in principle.



Sonntag, 9. November 2014

Data Center Mitts

Sometimes when external contractors have to do stuff in one of the high-security rooms of a data centre, my colleagues have to chaperone them. These rooms tend to be well air-conditioned, i.e. it gets cold after a while.

That’s why, a few weeks ago I received a “distress call” via chat from a work mate – to please bring him fingerless gloves the next day. He had been sitting and freezing there for a whole day and didn’t want to repeat that experience unprotected. When I looked through all the fingerless gloves in my wardrobe (many), I noticed that they were all made for women’s hands – and too slim to fit over male hands. Furthermore, many of my designs are rather feminine … So, I brought him my widest ones but promised to knit him a new pair – more suitable for his hands and less girly. A week later his own special pair was ready. Here they are - the data centre mitts :)



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Materials
  • 70 grams of 6-ply yarn
  • 3.5 mm dpns
  • 2 stitch markers
  • Stitch holder or scrap yarn
  • Tapestry needle to weave in ends

Abbreviations & Special Techniques
  • mk1p: make 1 purl stitch (as shown in this video, the first two ways are OK for this pattern)
  • C2B: cable 2 back, e.g. like shown in the this video. For me (unlike for the lady who provided the video, C2B is easier to do than C2F - choose for yourself but use the same stitch throughout the pattern :)  
  • pm: place marker
  • sm: slip marker
  • Backwards loop cast-on: shown in this video 
  • Pick up and knit: shown in this video

Instructions

CO56 sts and join in round
Knit 6 rounds of ribbing: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round

Start with cable pattern
Round 1 and 2: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 3: *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 4-5: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 6: *p2 C2F p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Knit rounds 1-6 a total of 5 times and start thumb gusset

Thumb gusset and upper part of mitt
(Thumb increases are knitted every 2nd round while the pattern of cabling once per 3 rounds is kept.)
Round 1: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, pm mk1p pm, p1, k2, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 2: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm, p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 3: p2 k2 p2 C2F, p1, sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1 k2 *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 4: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm , p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 5: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1,sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 6: p2 C2F p2 k2 p1, sm , p to next marker, sm, p1, k2 *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 7:  p2 k2 p2 k2, p1,sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 8: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm, p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 9: p2 k2 p2 C2F, sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1 k2 *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 10: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm, p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 11: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1,sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 12: p2 C2F p2 k2 p1, sm , p to next marker, sm, p1, k2 *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 13: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1,sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 14: p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm, p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 15: p2 k2 p2 C2F, sm, mk1p, p to 1 st before next marker, mk1p, sm, p1 k2 *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 16:  p2 k2 p2 k2, p1, sm, p to next marker, sm, p1, *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 17: p2 k2 p2 k2, put the next 17 stitches on a stitch holder or on scrap yarn (removing the markers), CO2 (with backwards loop cast-on), *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 18:  *p2 C2F p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Rounds 19 and 20:  *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 21: *p2 C2F p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 22 and 23: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 24: *p2 k2 p2 C2F repeat from * to end of round
Round 25 and 26: 4-5: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Round 27: *p2 C2F p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round

Knit 6 rounds of ribbing: *p2 k2 repeat from * to end of round
Bind-off loosely.

Thumb
Remove 17 thumb stitches from stitch holder and distribute them on 2 dpns. From the sides and above the thumb hole pick up and knit 5 stitches. with a third needle. (There are now 22 sts on your needles, the next needle to knit is the first one with the stitches from the stitch holder)

Row 1: p16 p2tog p3 p2tog (the p2togs are to close the gap between the stitches from above the thumb with the thumb gusset stitches - the last p2tog connects the last stitch of the first row with the first stitch of the next row - now there are only 20 stitches on your needles)
Rows 2-4: purl
Rows 5-8: *p1 k2 p1 repeat from * to end of round
Bind off loosely in pattern

Weave in ends.

Make two.

Samstag, 8. November 2014

Something Fishy

This is the first time, I tried to knit a fair isle pattern ... I clearly need some more practice before I can produce something better ... ;)

Sonntag, 2. November 2014

Scrunchies Again

These are scrunchies that I made from "hosiery yarn", i.e.  strips of cut up pantyhose.

Free DIY Tutorial: Knitted Pantyhose Scrunchies; http://knitting-and-so-on.blogspot.com

I used old "hosiery yarn" I made a few years ago (see blog post here) using the method described here.



Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Materials
  • to balls of hosiery yarn (in two colors) - one ball equals the yarn you get from one leg
  • one piece of hair elastic
  • rather big dpns - I used 12mm dpns, but other sizes will do as well
  • a tapestry needle for finishing

Instructions

The numbers in brackets refer to the numbers in the picture. Basically, you'll be knitting a tube around the hair elastic.

(1) With yarn A (beige in the picture) cast on 3 stitches (-> needle A)
On a second needle (-> needle B) cast on 3 stitches with yarn B (black in the picture)

(2) With yarn A knit all stitches from the needle B, the working yarn of both colors is now at the same place.

(3) Slip the hair elastic over needle A and the stitches on this needle. The elastic ends up between the needles. Turn work and knit all stitches on needle A with yarn B, slip the stitches on this needle back, and knit them with yarn A. There are now three rows on needle A (cast on with yarn A, one row with yarn B, and one row with yarn A) and two rows on needle B (cast on with yarn B, and one row of yarn A)

(4) Slip both balls of yarn through the ring, i.e. through the hair elastic and turn work. On needle B first knit all stitches with yarn B, then slip the stitches back and knit one row with yarn A. Turn work and repeat on needle A (i.e. knit one row with yarn B, slip the stitches back and knit them with yarn A). 

(5) Repeat step 4 until your knitted tube is long enough to fit around your hair elastic. Don't forget to slip the balls of yarn through the elastic ring at the beginning of each round.

(6) When the tube is long enough, prepare for finishing, i.e. slip only yarn B through the elastic and knit the three stitches on needle B with this yarn. Now the cast on and the last row on each needle are knitted in the same colour. Cut yarn but leave a tail of about 20 cm. Turn work - you're now facing needle A. with a tapestry needle and yarn B sew the stitches of the last row to the cast on - stitch by stitch, Turn work and do the same with yarn A for the stitches on needle B.

Knot the ends together and use the flat end of the tapestry needle to hide ends inside the tube. Whatever you do, the end will look a bit messy, but once you wear it in your hair, these irregularities will not be visible.

Free DIY Tutorial: Knitted Pantyhose Scrunchies; http://knitting-and-so-on.blogspot.com